Music and Reviews from Clare, Limerick, Waterford and sometimes further afield

Monday, February 24, 2020

Midterm Ramblings

Stormy weather and inertia put plans for an excursion on hold. So I stayed at home for the midterm break. However there was plenty of diversion in Waterford and I enjoyed that sense of being on holiday at home. Here is a roundup of the highlights.

Piano Virtuoso at the Large Room. Belfast native, Michael McHale was in Waterford on Thursday and it was heartening to see a a good turn out of 80+ patrons in the Large Room for a terrific performance. McHale addressed the audience adding some asides to the programme notes. The Chopin pieces, we learned were all dedicated to Charlotte Rothschild. It was a busy day for McHale with two recitals in different counties. Fortunately he had a driver and he acknowledged the support of his parents in fulfilling his engagements. It added to the general cheer to have Carmel and Noel McHale among the audience. I have on occasion, turned pages for Michael but there was no need for a page turner on Thursday as the entire programme was performed from memory. As we have come expect from a player at home in the best international venues, the playing was wonderfully
colourful and expressive. The jazz flourish of McHales's own interpretation of Danny Boy was a thrilling close to
the evening.

Check out McHales' tips for practicing pianist taken at the Steinway C piano in Waterford City Hall
https://www.facebook.com/pianodaywaterford/videos/1051774735188822/UzpfSTI3MzUwMzk1MjY2MDIxMzozMDA5MTA4MTE1NzY2NDM2/

Programme: Beethoven Moonlight Sonata;  Chopin Waltz, Mazurka, Ballade;
                     Beethoven Apassionata Sonata; John Field Nocturne; Irish Airs arr McHale My Lagan Love, Cailin O Cois tSuire Me ; Rigoletto paraphrase Liszt  Encore Danny Boy

The Mall was a hive of activity on Thursday. Across the road in the Waterford Crystal Centre, I caught the final stage of a spoken word event.  Ex-RTE presenters, Ciana Campbell and Michael Murphy  were reading from Murphy's book of poetry, The Ministry of Dreams as part of Project Music's programme of events. There was good stuff too in the Reg where a young man with a guitar was singing soulful ballads for midweek patrons.


10 Dark Secrets of 1798 Paddy Cullivan

While the Blues conceded to Bohemians, Paddy Cullivan formerly of the Late late Show House band was in action at Central Arts. His show wasn't quite what I was expecting. Opening and closing with a song performed to a backing track, Cullivan delivered an detailed illustrated lecture. The device of covering a lot of material in ten chunks worked quite well. There was no doubting the lengthy research or Cullivan's passion for the subject but I found it too long  for quite depressing content and yes, I think  I would have liked another song or two. With this format, I wondered might Cullivan fare better on the regular history talk series say in the Medieval Museum rather than at a less attentive Friday night gig audience.

Guitar Night
Duo Cry Monster Cry

Navan native Pat Coldrick brought an easy listening set list to the Theatre Royal. Down the road in  Central Arts, two brothers Jamie and Richie Martin AKA  Cry Monster Cry dropped off on a nationwide tour to present a sombre set tinged with nostalgia. There was a smack of the Everly Brothers in the effortless close harmonies and the jangle of mandolin and banjo gave it a folkie edge. It was all very mellow. A cover of Springsteen's Dancing in the Dark was one of the few uptempo numbers. Check them out here http://www.crymonstercry.com/






Radio Highlight of the week.